Friday, April 5, 2013

It's not about feeling balanced.


From another site:

No frail human morality can ever hope to contain the overflowing fullness of life with which Christ desires to rejuvenate the faithful.

...The world will not be saved by optimistic humanism that believes human progress and morality will eventually save the world. For Dostoevsky and the church fathers, man’s deepest problems are not moral, nor even psychological, but ultimately existential and ontological. It’s not about following the rules or feeling balanced. It is a matter of choice and it is a matter of human nature being touched by the hand of God Himself.

Only by daring to leap towards God in spite of the good and evil that exist in the heart can the believer hope to get beyond the contradiction of the human condition. In order to avoid descending into nihilism, Dostoevsky offers his readers another path: the acceptance of suffering and affliction in the context of a relationship with God. It is only in this context that man is able to recognize a path out of his fallen condition. It is only this Love that is able to transform suffering into salvific joy.

Read more here: Ancient Christian Wisdom blog

5 comments:

Anna@stuffedveggies said...

Beautiful! Thanks for sharing - very appropriate for this Lenten season - AND for this human era.

Farm Girl said...

I think the ancients understood it best. I am so glad you wrote this today. I want so badly to live that kind of life and yet, I think I do fall back into the life too often that just cringes away from suffering.

peacework projects said...

Thanks for this. . .

llasblog said...

So true!

KathyB. said...

Amen sister ! We in this country in this age seem to think all of life, especially the Christian life, should be one of ease, free of problems. I needed to read this, thank-you.